Category Archives: Reblogs

The First Epic Poem: The Descent of Inanna

Interesting Literature

In this week’s Dispatches from The Secret Library, Dr Oliver Tearle travels back over four millennia to find the oldest surviving epic poem

What’s the oldest epic poem in the world? Did it all begin with Homer’s Iliad? In one sense, we can grant this as an acceptable proposition, but if we wish to trace the true origins of ‘the epic’ as a literary form, we need to go back considerably further into the very hazy early years of literary history.

For the epic began in the Middle East with works like The Epic of Gilgamesh, the tale of a Sumerian king who possesses seemingly inhuman strength and who meets his match in the mysterious figure of Enkidu; this poem also, notably, features the Flood motif we also find in the Book of Genesis. But even Gilgamesh wasn’t the first epic. That honour should probably go to

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“Double Acrostic” – Lewis Carroll

On May 20, 1871, Lewis Carroll sent the following poem to Mabel and Emily Kerr of Canada. The poem was titled “Double Acrostic”. Can you figure out where the acrostics are? Thanks, thanks, fair Cousins, for your gift So swiftly borne to Albion’s isle — Though angry waves their crests uplift Between our shores, for […]

via Lewis Carroll’s “Double Acrostic” Poem — Learn Fun Facts

Clink on the link to read the poem. (I found MABEL, but not EMILY!) 

Jaywick – Into the salt flats – 3 — Journeys Through Pre-World War 3 Britain

The Jaywick saga continues as we trek through the Colne Point nature reserve and check out the desolate land between the the two towns. Running to find something. Colne Point. Dead crabs on the dirty ground. Block jumping. Discovering a world war two pillbox. We pushed on until the grass verge turned back to sea […]

via Jaywick – Into the salt flats – 3 — Journeys Through Pre-World War 3 Britain

Jaywick – Leaving this old town – 2 — Journeys Through Pre-World War 3 Britain

In this instalment, we head into the surrounding marshland and salt flats to the south of Jaywick. Eating somewhere old. Exploring somewhere new. A journey begins. The Heart of Marshness. 8.6.2013 17:47 The Seafisher’s Hand is an old seaside restaurant south of Jaywick, furnished with the type of tables and chairs you’d find in […]

via Jaywick – Leaving this old town – 2 — Journeys Through Pre-World War 3 Britain

George Seferis Quote — Kanti Burns, Book Reviews and more …

The English sometimes harbor inside them such a wild world – the civilized English as they usually call them. Consider only Wuthering Heights. Where else could a thirty year old girl have written such a thing? (Nobel-Prize-winning Greek poet George Seferis – Meres C: 218.) That is a very interesting question. And he knew London […]

via George Seferis Quote — Kanti Burns, Book Reviews and more …